Free U.S. shipping on orders over $200

FAQ

WHAT SKIS PAIR BEST WITH THE BISHOP?

Well, that is up to you, your riding style, conditions, etc. But, with the Bishop 2.0 and the technology available in today's wider, progressively rockered skis, you don't lose much in torsional rigidity and grip on the groomers, and they give you more float when the powder arrives. My all around boards are 98mm underfoot, and I bring out the 115mm underfoot fully rockered boards on powder days. I also have a pair of 87mm underfoot traditional camber skis that rock on hard pack and in bumps.

WHAT TELE BOOTS PAIR BEST WITH THE BISHOP?

Currently the Bishop only works with a traditional 75mm "duckbill" boot. Although the New Telemark Norm (NTN) Boots do fit into the Bishop, the lack of the duckbill causes the boot to come out of the toe bail if you go into a deep tele turn. As for which 75mm boots, we recommend a four buckle boot to match the power of the Bishop, although any 75mm boot will work. Dave rides the Scarpa T-Race.

WHAT'S THE STORY WITH HOW THE BISHOP CAME BACK? 

Did you know it was gone?... Dave Bombard acquired the rights to the Bishop telemark binding from Fin, the original owner of Bomber Industries and inventor of the Bishop 1.0 binding at the end of 2012. Fin took the binding off the market around 2009 to focus on his hardboot snowboard bindings (and lots of other cool projects, eventually leading him to sell Bomber and start Sulas Industries in 2015). Fin and Dave, both mechanical engineers, partnered together in 2011 to work on developing some cool new snowsports gear - while keeping their day jobs. In late 2012, they decided to spin off the Bishop into a separate business that Dave would lead. Fin and Dave together updated the design of the Bishop telemark binding for release in the fall of 2013.

Dave is excited to take the lead on the Bishop and apply his product design expertise from 20+ years of surgical instrument design to push the boundaries of performance snow sports gear.

WHAT ABOUT BISHOPS IN THE BACKCOUNTRY?

Some people think of the Bishop as a resort-only binding. I'd say it's an 80/20 resort to backcountry binding, for those who spend 80% or more of their free-heeling tele time in the resort, and 20% or less in the backcountry. It is a highly reliable and durable free-heel ski binding, so by definition it is at home in both the resort and the backcountry. For backcountry skiing, it has a 15 degree climbing wire to help on the skinning ascent, and a movable pivot that you can set in the forward position to make it less active and reduce the energy required to climb. It does not have a dedicated free pivot touring mode, which means you have to expend a little more energy on the climb, but there are also less mechanisms to fiddle with and break.  As many backcountry skiers can attest, many times the ride down can provide less than ideal snow conditions where you depend on a responsive, powerful binding. For me, the Bishop’s extra reliability and power is especially important when I am tackling more exposed lines where a technical issue with your binding can be dangerous.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE BISHOP 1.0 AND THE BISHOP 2.0?

The "Bishop 1.0" is what we call the original performance telemark ski binding that was produced by Bomber Industries in Silverthorne Colorado from 2000 to 2009. The Bishop 2.0 is the updated, improved version of the original bomber design released in the fall of 2013. The anodized colors of the Bishop 2.0 are different and the main technical difference between the Bishop 1.0 and 2.0 concern the main pivot and the Main Tubes.

The main pivot is the component where the U-shaped knuckle attaches to the Toe Block and allows for the Bishop's burly free-heel action. This pivot point has been re-designed to be a solid stainless steel thru axle vs. the two screw pins. Although it rarely happened, the old screw-in main pins could slightly back out during turns if Loctite was not applied and then they could fracture because the exposed threaded section of the part is much thinner. The new Thru Axle design eliminates that possibility, and gives you an even more bomber connection between the Knuckle and Toe Block bolted to the ski.

The main tubes have been re-designed with an increased wall thickness at the front end of the tube, that then tapers down. The old constant cross-section tubes could experience a fatigue fracture at the end of the slot after many, many days of hard charging skiing. The new design reduces the stress there by 30% according to finite element analysis (FEA) and should bring the stress that they see below the fatigue limit of this high strength aluminum. That is engineering nerd language for "even more bomber than before".